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Marcel Klehr floccus.org

Sync bookmarks privately across browsers with a server of your choosing

Marcel Klehr:

Remember Xmarks? It was great. Floccus does the same thing and even allows you to sync with whatever server you want: any Google Drive, any Nextcloud, any WebDAV server. With more backends in the works.

Floccus has extensions for Chrome (and its derivatives), Firefox, and Edge browsers.

Go github.com

Authelia is a multi-factor SSO portal for web apps

Authelia is an open-source authentication and authorization server providing 2-factor authentication and single sign-on (SSO) for your applications via a web portal. It acts as a companion of reverse proxies like nginx, Traefik or HAProxy to let them know whether queries should pass through. Unauthenticated users are redirected to Authelia Sign-in portal instead.

Authelia is a multi-factor SSO portal for web apps

Founders Talk Founders Talk #73

Balancing business and open source

Raj Dutt is the founder and CEO of Grafana Labs. Grafana has become the world’s most popular open source technology used to compose observability dashboards (we use Grafana here at Changelog). Raj and team are 100% focused on building a sustainable business around open source. They have this “big tent” open source ecosystem philosophy that’s driving every aspect of building their business around their open source, as well as other projects in the open source community. But, to understand the wisdom Raj is leading with today, we have to go back to where things got started. To do that we had to go back like Prince to 1999…

The Changelog The Changelog #419

Inside 2020's infrastructure for Changelog.com

We’re talking with Gerhard Lazu, our resident SRE, ops, and infrastructure expert about the evolution of Changelog’s infrastructure, what’s new in 2020, and what we’re planning for in 2021. The most notable change? We’re now running on Linode Kubernetes Engine (LKE)! We even test the resilience of this new infrastructure by purposefully taking the site down. That’s near the end, so don’t miss it!

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

An open source leader is gone, a remembrance of Dan Kohn

Thanks to Alex Williams over at The New Stack for doing a great write up remembering Dan Kohn and the tremendous mark he has left on open source and Cloud Native. Of course Dan had help along the way, but by-and-large the CNCF and “cloud native” as we know it are the direct result of Dan’s vision and leadership.

Thank you Dan. You will be missed.

We knew little in 2016 about what Dan was up to but we soon got a hint. The CNCF was already established but what it represented was still a bit unclear. If anything, Dan was a businessman and a computer scientist. He knew the economic importance of at-scale computing and the technical complexity that made it so fascinating.

The technical community was ready for someone like Dan — they needed help. Open source cloud native projects were growing but the resources were essential to keep progress moving. He was there to make sure the work got done that technologists should not have to do: Building awareness, supporting the publicity of new projects and perhaps most of all, smoothly running the conferences.

We’ve had Dan on The Changelog a few times. Go back and listen to episode #276 and episode #314 to hear from Dan himself about the journey of the CNCF and Cloud Native.

An open source leader is gone, a remembrance of Dan Kohn

Amazon Web Services github.com

An opinionated full-stack boilerplate for production AWS apps

The primary objective of this boilerplate is to give you a production ready code that reduces the amount of time you would normally have to spend on system infrastructure’s configuration. It contains a number of services that a typical web application has (frontend, backend api, admin panel, workers) as well as their continuous deployment. Using this boilerplate you can deploy multiple environments, each representing a different stage in your pipeline.

An opinionated full-stack boilerplate for production AWS apps

Dropbox Tech Blog Icon Dropbox Tech Blog

How we migrated Dropbox from Nginx to Envoy

In this blogpost we’ll talk about the old Nginx-based traffic infrastructure, its pain points, and the benefits we gained by migrating to Envoy. We’ll compare Nginx to Envoy across many software engineering and operational dimensions. We’ll also briefly touch on the migration process, its current state, and some of the problems encountered on the way.

Envoy, for the uninitiated, is a proxy server “designed for cloud-native applications”. It was created by Lyft and used by a lot of big players in the cloud/services world.

Not only is this article interesting as a “switching” story, it’s also fascinating because of the scale of the migration:

When we moved most of Dropbox traffic to Envoy, we had to seamlessly migrate a system that already handles tens of millions of open connections, millions of requests per second, and terabits of bandwidth.

High stakes!

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Build your own open source alternative to Google Suite with Nextcloud

A nice primer on Nextcloud, which is worth a second look if you haven’t kicked the tires in a couple years.

I recently revisited Nextcloud and was amazed by all the changes I saw. The project has evolved into a complete solution that can replace big-name solutions like Google Drive and Microsoft 365. Nextcloud’s new feature set, especially Nextcloud Hub, is outstanding, offering collaborative documentation editing, file version control, integrated chat and video calling, and more.

Oh, and ICYMI our conversation with Nextcloud’s Frank Karlitschek ~> #383

The Changelog The Changelog #383

From open core to open source

Frank Karlitschek joined us to talk about Nextcloud - a self-hosted free & open source community-driven productivity platform that’s safe home for all your data. We talk about how Nextcloud was forked from ownCloud, successful ways to run community-driven open source projects, open core vs open source, aligned incentives, and the challenges Nextcloud is facing to increase adoption and grow.

YouTube Icon YouTube

Let's set up a free, personal VPN in the cloud with Algo VPN

Following up on our awesome episode of The Changelog with Algo creator Dan Guido, I thought I’d kick the tires on this Ansible-based, self-hosted VPN solution to see what it’s like to actually set it up and configure my phone to use it. This is my first video of this kind. I’d love to know what you think! How can I do this better? Do you want moar like this? Keep my day job? What?!

Python github.com

Diagrams as Python code

Diagrams lets you draw the cloud system architecture in Python code. It was born for prototyping a new system architecture design without any design tools. You can also describe or visualize the existing system architecture as well. Diagrams currently supports four major providers: AWS, Azure, GCP and Kubernetes.

I’ve never found a diagramming tool I’ve enjoyed using. The idea of just writing some code and letting a tool do the drawing might be just what the doctor ordered. Start with the quick start.

Diagrams as Python code

Asad Faizi cloudplex.io

The hidden costs of Kubernetes and Cloud Native

Kubernetes has won and the cloud is a moving target. But, one thing that often gets lost in the mix with all the Cloud Native talk is the productivity costs associated with keeping up.

In the US alone, over 70% of enterprises have adopted or are currently adopting cloud-native architecture, causing a surge in developers who are trying to learn the stack.

It’s called the “cutting edge” for a reason…

Staying on the cutting edge…one critical area of productivity loss is keeping up with all the changing technologies.

Cloud-native architecture is still being developed and learning the latest technologies is a moving target. While at the same time, most computer science and software engineering programs don’t delve into the heart of these technologies. At best, graduates will have limited experience working with a handful of these cloud technologies…

Depending on your perspective or seat at the table, these hidden costs could be a good thing.

The Changelog The Changelog #377

Meet Algo, your personal VPN in the cloud

The commercial VPN industry is a minefield to navigate and many open source solutions are a pain to use or ill-suited for the task. Algo VPN, on the other hand, is a self-hosted personal VPN designed for ease of deployment and security. It uses the securest industry standards, builds on rock-solid solutions like WireGuard and Ansible, and runs on an ever-growing list of cloud hosting providers.

On this episode Dan Guido –CEO of security firm Trail of Bits and Algo’s creator– joins Jerod to discuss the project in depth.

Go Time Go Time #113

Go at Cloudflare

Jaana, Jon, and Mat are joined by John Graham-Cumming, the CTO of Cloudflare, to discuss Go at Cloudflare along with John’s unique involvement in Gordon Brown’s apology to Alan Turing. How did Cloudflare get started with Go? What problems do they use Go for and when to they turn to other languages? And how exactly did John’s petition for an apology to Turing get so popular?

The Changelog The Changelog #375

Gerhard goes to KubeCon (part 2)

Gerhard is back for part two of our interviews at KubeCon 2019. Join him as he goes deep on Prometheus with Björn Rabenstein, Ben Kochie, and Frederic Branczyk… Grafana with Tom Wilkie and Ed Welch… and Crossplane with Jared Watts, Marques Johansson, and Dan Mangum.

Don’t miss part one with Bryan Liles, Priyanka Sharma, Natasha Woods, & Alexis Richardson.

The Changelog The Changelog #374

Gerhard goes to KubeCon (part 1)

Changelog’s resident infrastructure expert Gerhard Lazu is on location at KubeCon 2019. This is part one of a two-part series from the world’s largest open source conference. In this episode you’ll hear from event co-chair Bryan Liles, Priyanka Sharma and Natasha Woods from GitLab, and Alexis Richardson from Weaveworks.

Stay tuned for part two’s deep dives in to Prometheus, Grafana, and Crossplane.

Privacy blog.acolyer.org

Local-first software: you own your data, in spite of the cloud

Watch out! If you start reading this paper you could be lost for hours following all the interesting links and ideas, and end up even more dissatisfied than you already are with the state of software today. You might also be inspired to help work towards a better future. I’m all in :).

I co-sign that sentiment. When the author says “this paper” they are referring to this paper which they are about to summarize. If you haven’t considered local-first software before, you should know that there are seven key properties to it, which are described in detail in the paper and in brief in the summary.

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