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Kubernetes

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications.
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Kubernetes stackoverflow.blog

Why you should build on Kubernetes from day one

To k8s or not to k8s, that is the question on lots of people’s minds these days. In this post on Stack Overflow’s blog, Max Horstmann argues it’s worth doing… and worth doing right away.

If you’re building a new app today, it might be worth taking a closer look at making it cloud-native and using Kubernetes from the jump. The effort to set up Kubernetes is less than you think. Certainly, it’s less than the effort it would take to refactor your app later on to support containerization.

Kubernetes ably.com

No, we don’t use Kubernetes

At Ably, we run a large scale production infrastructure that powers our customers’ real-time messaging applications around the world. Like in most tech companies, this infrastructure is largely software-based; also like in most tech companies, much of that software is deployed and runs in Docker containers.

As you might expect if you’ve been following the technology scene at all, the following question comes up a lot:

“So… do you use Kubernetes?”

Ably doesn’t, and Maik explains in this artiicle why.

We talked with @lawik about the same topic a few weeks back on Ship It! #7. We even did a follow-up YouTube stream. I think that a conversation with Maik would be really interesting 🎙

Martin Heinz martinheinz.dev

Could Kubernetes pods ever become deprecated?

In any software project, over time new features and APIs are added and from time-to-time some of them also become deprecated and eventually get removed. Even huge project such as Kubernetes is no exception to this, yet core parts of its API don’t really come to mind when thinking about deprecating and eventual removal. So, the question is - could a core object or API in Kubernetes, such as Pod, Deployment or Service be removed and if so, how would that go?

Ship It! Ship It! #8

Cloud Native fundamentals

Why Cloud Native? What are the guiding principles that you should keep in mind as you are choosing a project from the Cloud Native Landscape? How do you build & ship an app in a Cloud Native way? Katie Gamanji, Ecosystem Advocate @ CNCF and former cloud engineer for American Express, Condé Nast and Microsoft, joins Gerhard to cover these topics in the context of the Cloud Native Fundamentals course that she developed. 15,000 students have already enrolled, and the initial feedback has been great. Tune in if you want to know why you should too, how to do it and when the course will become available for free.

Ship It! Ship It! #7

Why Kubernetes?

This week on Ship It! Gerhard talks with Lars Wikman (independent Elixir/BEAM software consultant) why sometimes a monolith running on a single host with continuous backups and a built-in self-restore capability is everything that a small team of developers needs. That’s right, no Kubernetes or microservices. After 2 years of running changelog.com, a Phoenix monolith, on Kubernetes, what do I think? Join our discuss and find out!

The Changelog The Changelog #441

Inside 2021's infrastructure for Changelog.com

This week we’re talking about the latest infrastructure updates we’ve made for 2021. We’re joined by Gerhard Lazu, our resident SRE here at Changelog, talking about the improvements we’ve made to 10x our speed and be 100% available. We also mention the new podcast we’ve launched, hosted by Gerhard. Stick around the last half of the show for more details.

Kubernetes github.com

Porter is a Kubernetes-powered PaaS that runs in your own cloud provider

Porter brings the Heroku experience to your own AWS/GCP account, while upgrading your infrastructure to Kubernetes. Get started on Porter without the overhead of DevOps and customize your infrastructure later when you need to.

For more on Porter, tune in to Go Time live on June 1st! Mat Ryer will be asking Carolyn Van Slyck all about it. If live isn’t an option… subscribe to Go Time, why don’t ya?

Namespace conflict! I mistook this Porter for that Porter which Carolyn Van Slyck works on. That Porter will be the subject of the June 1st Go Time, not this Porter. If you want us to do a show on this Porter, let us know. 😎

Gerhard Lazu changelog.com/posts

🚀 KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2021

I really appreciate how well this event came together. The virtual platform and diversity played a big part in this world-class experience. This was the perfect one to Ship It!, a brand new Changelog show that honours the makers, the shippers, & the visionaries that see it through. Tune in mid-May to find out more about the behind-the-scenes of this event.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

How I built an on-premises AI training testbed with Kubernetes and Kubeflow

This is part 4 in a cool series on The New Stack exploring the Kubeflow machine learning platform.

I recently built a four-node bare metal Kubernetes cluster comprising CPU and GPU hosts for all my AI experiments. Though it makes economic sense to leverage the public cloud for provisioning the infrastructure, I invested a fortune in the AI testbed that’s within my line of sight.

The author shares many insights into the choices he made while building this dream setup.

How I built an on-premises AI training testbed with Kubernetes and Kubeflow

OpenAI Icon OpenAI

Scaling Kubernetes to 7,500 nodes

Whoa.

We’ve scaled Kubernetes clusters to 7,500 nodes, producing a scalable infrastructure for large models like GPT-3, CLIP, and DALL·E, but also for rapid small-scale iterative research such as Scaling Laws for Neural Language Models. Scaling a single Kubernetes cluster to this size is rarely done and requires some special care, but the upside is a simple infrastructure that allows our machine learning research teams to move faster and scale up without changing their code.

Kubernetes github.com

Making k8s do what it was always meant to do... order pizza! 🍕

It may be Monday, but that doesn’t mean we can’t have a bit of fun, does it? If fun to you is ordering pizza by writing some YAML… step right up and place your order:

$ kubectl get pizzastore store-123 -o yaml
kind: PizzaStore
metadata:
  name: store-123
spec:
  address: |
    51 Niagara St
    Toronto, ON M5V1C3
  id: "10391"
  phone: 416-364-3939
  products:
    - description: Unique Lymon (lemon-lime) flavor, clear, clean and crisp with no caffeine.
      id: 2LSPRITE
      name: Sprite
      size: 2 Litre

The Changelog The Changelog #419

Inside 2020's infrastructure for Changelog.com

We’re talking with Gerhard Lazu, our resident SRE, ops, and infrastructure expert about the evolution of Changelog’s infrastructure, what’s new in 2020, and what we’re planning for in 2021. The most notable change? We’re now running on Linode Kubernetes Engine (LKE)! We even test the resilience of this new infrastructure by purposefully taking the site down. That’s near the end, so don’t miss it!

Gerhard Lazu changelog.com/posts

The new changelog.com setup for 2020

In this post I share the latest 2020 and beyond details for changelog.com’s infrastructure.

Why Kubernetes? How is Kubernetes simpler than what we had before? What was our journey to running production on Kubernetes? What worked well? What could have been better? What comes next for changelog.com? Read this post and listen to episode #419 to learn all the details.

Kubernetes keel.sh

Keel is a tool for automating Kubernetes deployment updates

kubectl is the new SSH. If you are using it to update production workloads, you are doing it wrong. See examples on how to automate application updates.

We’re using this in our new Kubernetes-based infrastructure (more details on that coming to a podcast near you). Keel runs as a single container, scanning Kubernetes and Helm releases for outdated images. Super cool stuff, and even has a web interface (which we’re not using yet, but should).

Keel is a tool for automating Kubernetes deployment updates

Kubernetes github.com

K9s makes K8s look gooood ✨

We’ve linked K9s up in the past, but I’ve been playing with it today and I just had to share it again. Gerhard has us up and running on LKE (more on that coming to the blog and podcast soon) so I’ve had a chance to kick the tires a bit.

I have no idea how any of this magic works, but I do know that I like it and I’m excited to learn more. Here’s a screen grab of its Pulses feature, which gives you an overview of your entire cluster.

K9s makes K8s look gooood ✨

Kubernetes github.com

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Tightly integrated with GitLab, GitHub, and Bitbucket, Gitpod automatically and continuously prebuilds dev environments for all your branches. As a result, team members can instantly start coding with fresh, ephemeral and fully-compiled dev environments - no matter if you are building a new feature, want to fix a bug or do a code review.

There’s a SaaS offering that’s free for open source or you can self-host it if you prefer.

Fully-baked, collaborative development environments in your browser
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